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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a dif
of goes to at what's at the heart of constitutionalism and rule of law, and looking back at the list of things that you listed. in the course of that conversation after a long discussion about the constitutionalism, a center. essentially blackmun turns to moyers and says it's really the preamble that breathes life into the constitution. and i wondered whether that's a point of view that you hold and whether you think it has relevance in the situation we're talking about now. >> , preamble, we the people and united states, et cetera, i used to be able to quote it, i don't think i can now. anyway, it's written down. and the preamble is important saying we the people. but is not the only thing. and i say that because i do think, i had a very interesting conversation in china, i thought. i've gone there twice. the first time was a few years ago, maybe eight or 10, when we went to beijing and then we went to shanghai. and in shanghai we are asked to meet with a group of businessm businessmen, and these businessmen have all been involved in the.com. they lost a lot of money. most of them h
vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
because of russia's president and lawmakers. up next, the reaction now that vladimir putin signed a law banning americans from adopting russian kids. >>> maybe congress should take lessons from dock workers and employers. they came up with a compromise to avoid a strike that could have cost our economy billions. >>> the meeting of the minds in the middle is next. [ all ] 3, 2, 1... [ male announcer ] as the year counts down, your savings can add up with the adt new year's sale. help protect your family with the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 -- a savings of $300 plus 15% off accessories. but you must call before midnight january 2nd. more than a security system, adt can help let your family in from the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more importan
care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing
its attention to renewing a controversial surveillance law. they spent hours on this yesterday. some people say it violates the rights of americans. we'll look at the pros and the cons. stay with us. harris: new information about the u.s. soldier accused of killing 16 afghan villagers in a predawn rampage. the u.s. army is now saying it will seek the death penalty against staff sergeant robert bales. he faces premeditated murder and other charges in the attack on the villages that left 16 people dead among them women and children in southern afghanistan. that happened back in march. the attack drew such angry protests in the country the u.s. temporarily halted combat operations there. bales says attorney says his client should not serve the death penalty because he was serving the fourth deployment in a war zone. he is serving in fort lewis mccord in washington state. let's talk with a former prosecutor. >> thanks for having me. harris: let's start with what the defense team is saying. multiple deployments are a defense. why? >> they're saying because of multiple deployments there wa
the conflicting answers. plus, 2013 will be a pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference.
's for it to be approved and signed into law. today's the 27th. the senate comes back in session today, the house is in pro-forma so it probably will not do any work. you only have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal -- ink a deal. the president took off last night from hawaii, but there's a five-hour time difference. time is working against these lawmakers. they will have to figure out something if they want to do anything before new year's. it seems quite likely that we are going to go over this cliff and that whatever happens is going to have to be resolved after january 1. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someo
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
americans from adopting russia children. i can't believe this happening in retaliation law for cracking down on russia human rights vialators. >> these children are not available to international adoption until after they have been on a domestic registry for eight months n our son's case, 22 families, russia families came to see him and rejected him because of his blood line. >> julia: this woman was on o'rielly and laura ingraham was hosted it . she had adopted two russian children. she doesn't know if they will see the boy. they have gone over there constantly to get close to the little boy. more than 60,000 russian children have been taken in by americans in the past two decades. massive winter storm that killed 16 people so far continues to move over the northeast. it is expected to head into canada today as many travelers are trying to get home after christmas. they had flights cancelled all over the place and delaying 8000 more. many northwest states saw a foot of snow . in vermont, 21 inches. hard-hit arkansas, 200,000 homes and businesses lost power. the bush family said, put away th
is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations, bans them from also traveling to the united states. i want to bring in our matthew chance from london. and matthew, of course, you were a correspondent in moscow for a very long time here. it seems at least there's a split. you've got russia's foreign minister who actually criticized putin before he signed this ban. so what is going on here? is this a power play? and is this something that is actually going to take effect? >> i mean, you're right. there has been a very rare split in the russian political elite about this issue. there's been some criticism that was leaked to the press in russia about how some officials including the foreign minister concerned about what the impact this may have. also an opposition newspaper in russia has issued a petition, saying the law should not been enacted. that's had more than 100,000 signatures. obviously, it's something that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power
year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automati
to serve. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. patrick dempsy has a strong tie to the city. wish him luck. back to you. >> clayton: lack of security. and so we thought according to the new york post security officials that were sacked after the release of the benghazi report are still on the government's pay roll and will be back to school with work. here is the reaction lieutenant cornel tony schafer. when you heard the report that came out around christmas, what did you think? it is an extended montyepython skit. the idea here is that these people are not held accountable . this is but one more layier clayton of regarding the whole ben
to the health care law is of course a tea party favorite and a favorite of social conservatives, but money and the backing of the clintons didn't do the trick for mccullough last time around. key question this time, which flawed candidate wins this race or supposedly flawed candidate? mccullough is hoping to break this curse. since 1976, the party that wins the presidency loses the state's gubernatorial election the next year. it's never wavered. 20 2001, after bush was elected, mark warner, he defeated a republican. 52% of the vote. in 2005, after bush's election, tim kaine beat jerry kilgore by six points. bob mcdonnell won in obama's first year in office. it would turn out to be 40%. the electorate likely to be a little whiter, older, more conservative than it was in virginia. will it be conservative enough to elect ken kutch anele. speaking of the campaign, if you're thinking of working on hillary's presidential campaign, you're supposed to send your resumf to terry mccullough. in new jersey, where the governor's race is all about one man, chris christie and 2016. he hopes to scare off
's anticorruption law that denies russian officials from getting u.s. visas if they were associated with human rights violations. >> it's very tragic that these children are potentially going to fall victim to really the senseless politics. >> reporter: lauren koch with the national council for adoption says, with 700,000 russian orphans, the kids are the ones caught in the political web. >> most of them have been matched with children. they consider these children part of their families already. they have introduced, you know, them via pictures and other methods to their siblings here in the united states. and it's really heartbreaking. >> bring it over here so we can see it. >> reporter: a heartbreak that could become a reality for the fong family who can do nothing but wait, watch and hope. >> we're the fong family. we want to provide a home to just at least one boy from russia and, you know, we have a home, we have a lovely family, we're hoping that all this can move forward and this will be the last christmas he's alone. >> reporter: in reference to this ban, the u.s. state department s
they cannot afford to repay. the national consumer law attorney took part in the discussion examining student loan debt and its effects on both the student and the parents. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> with a degree come student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and
things done, tax reform, immigration reform, we have to finish implementing the health care law a year from right now, people are going to be signing up for exchanges in states all over the country. >> what do you -- >> we don't know if barack obama is a liberal, moderate, debating that four years, six years. next year, we will know what -- >> a pragmatic. >> an ideologue at times? we will know. >> i'm going to put you on the spot. >> i'm ready. >> mcauliffe. the big race of 2013, which by the way will dominate the washington media market, mcauliffe and cuccinelli. >> going off to -- >> does he win? >> cuccinelli, he wins, 2016? >> the year of 2012, besides barack obama's re-election, the year america got comfortable with gay marriage. nothing think b that is it for this special year-end edition of the daily run down. watch us every week date 9 a.m. here on msnbc. happy holidays. happy new year. be safe from all of us at the daily run down. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male a
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)